I am restarting the weekly tour around the United States, with a change. This time I am putting in the Sabian Symbol of the week into the mix previously we did that, but erratically. Now I am finding the asteroid that would approximate the position of that card and placing it on the chart. So from my Sabian deck of cards, I got 29 Sagittarius. The closest asteriod is Panacea at 27 Libra 34 and appears on this weeks chart in Jackson, Mississippi cast for March 9 2021 at 6 am in the morning, in the third house. As this is a Mundane Chart suggesting for the third house education, schools, periodical newspapers, radio and telegraphs. All types of transit, perhaps including astrological ones.

In the meantime on the Covid Watch, four states (Montana, Iowa, Mississippi, and North Dakota) have allowed statewide orders for masking to expire, while 35 states currently have statewide mask orders, including all 23 states with Democratic governors and 12 out of the 27 states with Republican governors. You can follow these developments on Ballotpedia.

Exercising the Symbol

Thus we have Panacea melding with the Sabian Symbol of a “perspiring fat kid mowing the grass”. Well if you ask me, exercise would be a good tonic in this case, and the symbol demands an unsparing look at one’s habits and see what must be shorn or let go. Negatively, it suggests not seeing the forest for the trees, perhaps here we do not want to be informed but remain with blinders on, safe at home, not susceptible to anything.  That could be the case as the only exact aspects Panacea is making is first to Pluto in  Capricorn in the sixth,  with the other Mercury, and essential lord of the third house, a trine.  That trine actually creates a great trine to the Part of Fortune, if we are interested in using it that way, which wouldn’t you just know is really in Gemini but in the eleventh and no matter how you cut and slice it, this is a lot of air.

Of course the real growing anger is the supposed panacea itself — the vaccine, which Joe Biden and Kamala Harris made their focal point during the campaign, and perhaps Venus in the eighth is warning that to get through the pandemic one has to harvest aborted babies, at least if you get the vaccine from Johnson & Johnson or Pfizer, the American pharmaceuticals; the Spanish Moderna is not using fetuses though the Catholic Pope has endorsed the method as morally acceptable..  Perhaps that is why Neptune the Sun and Venus are all together in the eighth, they do not understand his stance either.  At least he did not invoke the cloak of infallibility when he said it, so technically if you are Catholic, you can ignore it and the diocese of Saint Louis is.

Jackson has its own diocese, and they are against removing the masks naturally. encouraging their members to continue wearing ” masks, use social distancing, hand sanitizers, and have no gatherings before or after Mass. Communion should be in the hand only. Dispensation from the obligation to attend Mass will also stay in place out of consideration ‘for people who would love to be there but are concerned about their health so they don’t have that weighing on their conscience.’” .

So check this week where your Panacea is and its relationship to the transiting chart, perhaps there is something you need to discuss and air out.

This week’s aspects

MondayMoon in Capricorn
sextile Sun in Pisces,
sextile Venus in Pisces
conjunct Pluto in Capricorn
TuesdayMoon enters Aquarius
Moon trine Mars in Gemini
Moon sextile Chiron in Gemini (near our Part of Fortune btw)
Moon square Uranus in Taurus
WednesdayMoon moves to Pisces
Moon conjunct Neptune modern ruler of Pisces
Moon conjunct Venus exalted in Pisces
ThursdayMoon enters Pisces
Moon conjunct Neptune
Sun and Moon in Pisces
Sun conjunct Neptune in Pisces
Moon and Sun conjunct Mercury
Moon sextile Uranus in Taurus
Friday
the same as yesterday
SaturdayMoon same as before but now sextile Pluto in Capricorn
Moon enters Aries at 6:44 EST.
Daylight savings ends now.
SundaySPRING FORWARD
Moon in Aries sextile Mars in Gemini
Moon in Aries conjunct Chiron the Centaur in Aries
Moon in Aries sextile Saturn in Aquarius

Footnotes


1. New Larousse Encyclopaedia of Mythology
Crown Publishers, New York, New York, c. 1987 third edition.

In Tyre, Eshmun the god of health was venerated. The Greeks equated Eshmun with Asclepius who was born of Ashtart (Astarte? Ishtar who in Greece became Aphrodite) , one of Sydyk’s daughters. Sydyk is the discoverer of Salt and to which the Roman goddess Salus owes his name and from whence Salve — our modern salves but also Salut– comes and why when we address a letter it is a Salutation, a greeting of good will and good wishes for the person.

But at Epidaurus another tradition of the birth of Asclepius occurred. Here the story goes that Koronis, daughter of Phlegyas, king of the Lapthis and son of Ares, had yielded to Apollo and conceived a son. When she was aware of her pregnancy she married Ischys, but a crow whom Koronis had left to watch over, saw her antics, and flew to Phlegyas to tell the tale. Apollo fuming when he heard that the crow had tattled on him, turned the crow black and cursed him that it would never say a “good tiding again.” Then he killed Ischys.

Koronis horrified Ischys was dead, decided to get revenge with Apollo, and cut the baby out of her womb, throwing him into the nearby fire, but Apollo saved it, naming him Asclepius means “to cut open” or away. He bestowed on his son,, the art of healing, as children of the gods have some miraculous gift.

But that was not the end of the story, Phlegyas hearing all of this from the crow, no doubt, marched on Delphi, the sacred grounds of Apollo and his twin sister Artemis, and burnt it to the ground in keeping with his fiery heritage. Apollo won that round and threw Phlegyas into Tartarus where he was tortured. No mention of the tortue but we knew it could not have been easy or painless.

The typical story though is that Koronis exposed the new-born child on Mount Titthion, ashamed of her deed and wanting to be rid of it before her father returned. There a wise goat, called Chiron, fed it and a dog guarded it (Capricorn and Cancer) until Aresthanas, a shepherd, discovered it and was struck by the supernatural light which played over the child. Be that as it may, the god of health was always considered to be the offspring of light or fire.

To the sick he restored the warmth they had lost. Hence he was the object of great veneration in Greece. He was surrounded by auxiliary divinities: to begin with, Epione, his wife, who bore the two Asclepiads, Podaleirius and Machaon (asteroids both). Both took part as Thessalians of Tricca, from whom it was said was their kingdom, in the Trojan war and were as skilled in medicine as their father.

Machaon, was a surgeon and cured Menelaus of an arrow wound. and also Philoctetes, the great archer and hero of Sophocles’s eponymously named play, before being fatally wounded himself Nestor, one of the suitors of Helen of Troy and the only one of King Neleus’s sons to return to Greece,, brought Machaon’s body back from the field of Troy to be buried. Today there is a medical company named in his honour.

Podaleirius survived the expedition and on his return was cast by a tempest on to the shores of Caria where he settled.

Asclepius was sometimes represented as a serpent, but more frequently as a man of middle age with an expression of benevolence, and his cult was at the same time both a religion and a system of therapeutics. His sanctuaries, such as those at Tricca, Epidaurus, Cos and Pergamus, (Pergamon) all built outside the towns on particularly healthy sites. ‘The priests in charge of them at first held a monopoly of medical knowledge which was handed down from father to son. It was only later that they admitted outsiders as neophytes.

During the night Asclepius would appear to the patient in a dream and give him advice. In the morning the priests would interpret the dream and explain the god’s precepts. Patients would thank Asclepius by tossing gold into the sacred fountain and by hanging ex-votos on the walls of the temple.


#2. Despite Larousse’s claim that Eshmun is from Tyre, now Lebanon, Stephanie Dalley in her Myths from Mesopotamia, has no god of health listed in her glossary with that name and I could not find him anywhere else. They must know something I don’t.


3. A good site on the medical asteroids is at the StraightWoo , but be aware, some of their links do not resolve.

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