Fiji Quake 26 September 2017

The  pattern of extreme weather shows no signs of relenting as two quakes struck Fiji, but the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center says there is little threat of a tsunami after the initial 6.5 magnitude earthquake despite Fiji being in the Ring of Fire.  The first occurred  at 2.20pm FJST (Fiji Summer Time) though Janus feels it was Fiji standard time and the chart shows their view. There is nothing in the chart, shown for the capitol Suva, that makes this a major quake.

Indeed, the quake itself occurred at a depth of 104 km (64 miles), south of the capitol in the South Pacific ocean, the Hawaii-based PTWC said. There was another second, and smaller, quake registering 289km north of Ndoi island. It was about 579km deep.

Papua New Guinea was also struck by a 6.0 magnitude earthquake on Tuesday morning, but there are no times recorded as of now. When I get it, I will create a chart for that quake. All three are on in the Southern Hemisphere, and there were no lives lost, at least from what the latest reports, but they are also in the Ring of Fire– so is California.

The eclipse connection

–according to William Lilly, an astrologer par excellence, earthquakes are quite common after an eclipse, which of course was the Great American Eclipse of August 21st, which began near Newport, Oregon at 1:16 PM EDT and ended near Charleston, South Carolina at 2:48 PM EDT. The distance from Newport to Fiji is about 6,791.28 mi (10,929.51 km) with the midpoint in the Pacific Ocean about 150 miles south of Honolulu.

As the eclipse effect is measured from one eclipse to the next or within six months, this earthquake does fit in the pattern and as previously noted, Fiji is in the Ring of Fire making it prone to them.

C161 Dr Edmond Eger anasthesiologist/scientist

Dr. Edmond I. Eger II, was a leader in the development of the universally used technique to determine the proper dose of anesthetic gas administered in operating rooms — an advance that has saved an untold number of lives and made surgery safer for everyone.   I once jokingly asked my late Uncle Arthur, also an anesthesiologist, though in Detroit, what was the big deal about anaesthesia — why did it pay so well  [fmn} and also by the way it has correspondingly astronomical malpractice fees [/fmn]  And he said “You want to wake up don’t you?”

Our header picture is The Gross Clinic by American master Thomas Eakins, who is shown in the painting in the upper left busy painting away. You can read more about the painting and its importance in art here on the NPR site.

The doctor died on September 20, 2017 from pancreatic cancer, said Dr. Steven L. Shafer, a professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California and editor of an up coming autobiography of Dr. Eger.  He was 86 years old.

A Mac Man

Inhaled gases like ether and chloroform had been in use as anesthetics for more than 100 years when Dr. Eger graduated from medical school in 1955, but there was still no clear standard for dosing, or for comparing the strength of one gas to another.

Without a systematic way to measure the effects of anesthesia, doctors looked for signs like changes in a patient’s muscle tone, breathing and pupil diameter. But those traits were of no use in research because they varied from patient to patient and did not occur in lab animals. As new anesthetic gases were developed, the need grew for a more precise way to test, compare and dose them.

Dr. Eger devised a method working with Dr. Giles Merkel, Dr. Lawrence Saidman and other anesthesiologists at the University of California, San Francisco. They identified one value to use as a benchmark: the concentration of anesthesia at which 50 percent of patients did not move in response to a painful stimulus, like being cut with a scalpel.

Other patients would require a slightly higher or lower concentration to achieve the same effect, but the variations were not large. That led to their introduction in 1965 of a concept, called the minimum alveolar concentration, or MAC, that quickly became the standard measure of potency for anesthetic gases. Because powerful anesthetics work best at lower concentrations and thus weaker version require higher doses, a lower MAC value would indicate a stronger drug. Anesthesiologists use MAC values when planning doses needed for surgery.

The values are highly consistent from one patient to another and even among animals. For any given drug, about the same concentration can anesthetize a 200-pound man, a smaller woman, a dog or a rat. The amount needed to reach that concentration differs depending on the patient’s size, but the effective concentration itself does not change.

Edmond "Ted" Eger
Dr. Eger in an undated photograph. Credit Richard Schlobohm

Dr. Shafer said the technique devised by Dr. Eger and his colleagues made the administering of anesthesia far safer and has saved millions of lives.In later work, Dr. Eger identified new drugs that could be used as anesthesia, such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, which are still the most widely used general anesthetics.

“Ted Eger revolutionized modern anesthetic practice, and led the way to the development of the anesthetic gases used tens of millions of times a year,” Dr. Michael A. Gropper, the chairman of the department of anesthesia and perioperative care at the University of California, San Francisco, wrote in an email.

A poor salesman

As a boy, Dr. Eger skipped at least one grade, became a whiz at checkers and led the Hyde Park High School checker team to two city championships. He graduated at 15, but, as a bored and indifferent student, wound up in the bottom 20 percent of the class.

“The ‘ah ha!’ moment, the thrill of solving the hardest puzzle in all of pharmacology, the biological mechanism that responds to anesthesia, awaits another investigator.”

Dr. Eger in his Autobiography

He was soon hired to sell women’s shoes, but after only one day on the job he decided he had had enough and resolved to apply for college. He was accepted at Roosevelt College in Chicago, where “he went from not working at all to working his butt off,” Dr. Shafer said. After a year, he transferred to the University of Illinois, where he majored in chemistry with a minor in math. He went to medical school at Northwestern University.

In 1955, the same year he graduated from Northwestern, he married Dollie Ross, a speech therapist. The marriage ended in divorce in 1983. In 1996, he married Dr. Lynn Spitler, an immunologist, who survives him. Dr. Eger is also survived by three daughters, Cris Cadence Waste, Doreen J. Eger and Renee R. Eger, and a son, Edmond Eger III, all from his first marriage; a half-brother, Larry Eger; two stepchildren; seven grandchildren; and six step-grandchildren.

After completing his internship and residency, Dr. Eger served for two years as a captain in the medical corps, based at the Army hospital at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. From 1960 to 2006 he was a faculty member at the University of California, San Francisco. He was an author of more than 500 scientific articles and an author or editor of seven books.

“He received every award known to man in his specialty,” Dr. Shafer said.

Dr. Eger spent the last 20 years of his career trying to understand how inhaled anesthetics work. The drugs and their effects remain a mystery. The same concentration that knocks out a person will anesthetize a sea slug or an amoeba, and will even paralyze a fern that normally curls up when touched, Dr. Shafer said. The universality of those reactions suggests the drugs are tapping into some biological mechanism that evolved eons ago

The Ted Chart

An interesting point in Dr. Eger’s chart is its low fire showing instead of inspiration, he relied more on intuitive (water) hunches born from enlightened (air) experience (earth), He also has no grand trine to unite various parts of the chart, but instead a Grand Cardinal Square

Dr, Eger’s Grand Cardinal Square often shows up in people who rely on their free will to deal with opposing forces in their life, thus like his original foray as a shoe salesman, that he was unsuccessful there was not important to him, but the experience of trying it out. It did not take long for him to see, the grand square “irked” him into making another career choice which would be aligned to the houses his grand square lies in : 12th house hospital, 6th house medicine, 2nd and 8th house dealing with other people’s bodies handling drugs to prevent death.

Thus his “karmic cross” required him to swallow his pride, and admit his mistake of not applying to college for a professional career, and playing to his strength — intellectual endeavours. Some with cosmic crosses cannot swallow their humility and try again on another track, forever stubbornly stuck in that pattern. Of course a lot of that depends upon whatever other aspects encourage the lethal intellectual arrogance; luckily Dr. Eger did not suffer from that particular problem.

Sanriku Earthquake 1933

The Sanriku earthquake on March 2, 1933 at 10:30 am LMT was the most powerful quake to hit Japan in over 180 years.  It registered 8.5 on the Richter scale but Japan gets a lot of earthquakes, including one very recently in October 2021, because it is not only in the infamous volcanic Ring of Fire, it literally sits atop it.

The Ring of Fire

While Johnny Cash made music headlines with his “Ring of Fire” in 1963, the volcanic version is far older, and not nearly as melodious but the two do have something in common, an errant eye. Like the song, the real Ring is composed of a bunch of plates that collide with each other, looking to leave their own happy home and move in on another’s territory because the latter either does not have anyone standing guard to stop them, or because nature abhors a vacuum and welcomes the visit. Either way, the new plate is open to poaching. It sounds fantabulous, but in reality that is what plate tectonics is all about — one crowded stressed plate looking for space in another area, because like rats in cage they need to break out and bust a move. Alas like in real life when the the two plates collide, fireworks happen and that is either a volcanic eruption or an earthquake, In truly bad confrontations, both.

The word “Ring” is also a bit of a misnomer as the arc that spans the area from Java, east of Krakatoa, goes up to the Aleutians in Alaska down to Patagonia in Argentina but never fully closes, but the word ring is much more evocative and poetic. The Ring is made of a series of ocean trenches, look above for “trench” tags on the map, above for where those long narrow valley gnash into the heart of the sea floor and create some of the deepest gullies on the earth.

James Cameron, the director Avatar, Titanic and Blue, made history, nearly ten years ago, when he went solo in a tailored made submarine seven miles into the Marianas trench — a lifeless lightless trip with subzero temperatures. In comparison, the much ballyhooed space travelers went a mere 351,000 feet up in space and that with fellow excursionists.

Do earthquakes happen at bad times?

In 1933, while geisha Sada Abe was striking out, the Japanese military eyeing the USA for conquest, the Sanriku quake occurred. Today, October 21, with the Summer Olympics a major loss for hosting Japan, Covid rearing its head via the feared Delta variant, another major quake hits. Does the old saw of what above, so below ring true? It’s hard to say, but the analogies for these set of events is striking, but how true over the course of history is another question.

a Our featured images of the previous quake on Sanriku that was much lower in velocity but had a 30,000 dead body count.  You can read more about that one here on The Japan Times site.

It has two very remarkable things:  the first is that Uranus is in Aries in the 7th House and it is square Pluto in Cancer in the Tenth. The second thing is the Sextile to Venus in Aquarius suggesting that the rain would be “unusual” or different from normal.  The Daily Kos has a good write-up on it disaster, click here to read more.

The setup is a lipped bowl, this time scooping up the first through fourth houses, raining down on personal experiences and creating with the Moon in the Eighth House in Taurus at 19.41 , a fearful & unforgettable experience but also cautioning not to allow one’s fear take hold of one’s good judgement.

E.C. Chambers calls that degree the “Whirligig” and as it is semi-sextile Uranus it would seem that the Moon did a lot that day to pump up the disruptive volume and create a tsunami of extraordinary proportions particularly as the co-ruler of that Scorpion Eighth House was sextile the Moon nestling up to the Mid-heaven at 08.44 Cancer

Saturn at 11.05 is on the Fifth House Cusp of Aquarius showing the despair that the inhabitants felt that their doom was impending and their hopes and dreams gone especially as it is sextile the Sun in Pisces.

Strife was the watchword and Mars conjunct Neptune was showing how the stress of the geological plates (Mars rules metal; Neptune the seas) opposite the Sun took on a life of its own. A newsreel from the time captures this unfortunately very well.

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Dr Edmond Eger anasthesiologist/scientist


Dr. Edmond I. Eger II, a leader in the development of a now universally used technique to determine the proper dose of anesthetic gas administered in operating rooms — an advance that has saved an untold number of lives — died on Aug. 26 at his home in Tiburon, Calif. He was 86.
The cause was pancreatic cancer, said Dr. Steven L. Shafer, a professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at Stanford University, and the editor of a coming autobiography of Dr. Eger.
Inhaled gases like ether and chloroform had been in use as anesthetics for more than 100 years when Dr. Eger graduated from medical school in 1955, but there was still no clear standard for dosing, or for comparing the strength of one gas to another.
Without a systematic way to measure the effects of anesthesia, doctors looked for signs like changes in a patient’s muscle tone, breathing and pupil diameter. But those traits were of no use in research because they varied from patient to patient and did not occur in lab animals. As new anesthetic gases were developed, the need grew for a more precise way to test, compare and dose them.
Dr. Eger devised a method working with Dr. Giles Merkel, Dr. Lawrence Saidman and other anesthesiologists at the University of California, San Francisco. They identified one value to use as a benchmark: the concentration of anesthesia at which 50 percent of patients did not move in response to a painful stimulus, like being cut with a scalpel.

Other patients would require a slightly higher or lower concentration to achieve the same effect, but the variations were not large.
That led to their introduction in 1965 of a concept, called the minimum alveolar concentration, or MAC, that quickly became the standard measure of potency for anesthetic gases.
Because powerful anesthetics work at lower concentrations and weaker ones require higher doses, a lower MAC value would indicate a stronger drug. Anesthesiologists use MAC values when planning doses needed for surgery.
The values are highly consistent from one patient to another and even among animals. For any given drug, about the same concentration can anesthetize a 200-pound man, a smaller woman, a dog or a rat. The amount needed to reach that concentration differs depending on the patient’s size, but the effective concentration itself does not change.
Dr. Shafer said the technique devised by Dr. Eger and his colleagues made the administering of anesthesia far safer and has saved millions of lives.
Photo
Dr. Eger in an undated photograph. Credit Richard Schlobohm
In later work, Dr. Eger identified new drugs that could be used as anesthesia, such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, which are still the most widely used general anesthetics.
“Ted Eger revolutionized modern anesthetic practice, and led the way to the development of the anesthetic gases used tens of millions of times a year,” Dr. Michael A. Gropper, the chairman of the department of anesthesia and perioperative care at the University of California, San Francisco, wrote in an email.
Edmond I. Eger II was born on Sept. 3, 1930, in Chicago. (His parents gave him a middle initial but not a middle name.) His father was an advertising executive, and his mother, the former Miriam Newmann, was a homemaker.
As a boy, Dr. Eger skipped at least one grade, became a whiz at checkers and led the Hyde Park High School checker team to two city championships. He graduated at 15, but, as a bored and indifferent student, wound up in the bottom 20 percent of the class.
He was soon hired to sell women’s shoes, but after only one day on the job he decided he had had enough and resolved to apply for college. He was accepted at Roosevelt College in Chicago, where “he went from not working at all to working his butt off,” Dr. Shafer said. After a year, he transferred to the University of Illinois, where he majored in chemistry with a minor in math. He went to medical school at Northwestern University.
In 1955, the same year he graduated from Northwestern, he married Dollie Ross, a speech therapist. The marriage ended in divorce in 1983. In 1996, he married Dr. Lynn Spitler, an immunologist, who survives him. Dr. Eger is also survived by three daughters, Cris Cadence Waste, Doreen J. Eger and Renee R. Eger, and a son, Edmond Eger III, all from his first marriage; a half-brother, Larry Eger; two stepchildren; seven grandchildren; and six step-grandchildren.
After completing his internship and residency, Dr. Eger served for two years as a captain in the medical corps, based at the Army hospital at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. From 1960 to 2006 he was a faculty member at the University of California, San Francisco. He was an author of more than 500 scientific articles and an author or editor of seven books.
“He received every award known to man in his specialty,” Dr. Shafer said.
Dr. Eger spent the last 20 years of his career trying to understand how inhaled anesthetics work. The drugs and their effects remain a mystery. The same concentration that knocks out a person will anesthetize a sea slug or an amoeba, and will even paralyze a fern that normally curls up when touched, Dr. Shafer said. The universality of those reactions suggests that the drugs are tapping into some biological mechanism that evolved eons ago.
Dr. Eger regretted that he had not been able to discover that mechanism, writing in his autobiography, “The ‘ah ha!’ moment, the thrill of solving the hardest puzzle in all of pharmacology, awaits another investigator.”

#341 Star Crossed Scott Fitzgerald

Born in St. Paul Minnesota on September 24, 1896, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald really was named after the relative who penned the national anthem, the Star Spangled Banner.   He joked once driving by his ancestor’s statue in Baltimore  “Don’t let Uncle Frank see me drunk!”

 

fitz and zela.jpg
Zelda and Scott

Scott was urbane and Princeton educated, yet he and the macho Hemingway struck up a fast friendship after meeting in Paris in 1925. Their relationship was complicated by Hemingway’s intense dislike of Zelda Fitzgerald, whom he described a “crazy”  (she was) and a distraction to her husband’s writing; he told the younger man to ditch her so he could amount to something.

 

Scott did not listen and Poppa grew weary of giving unlistened advice and by 1937 they drifted apart:  Scott lamented it often but he tended to be maudlin.

scott fitzgerald chart.jpg

                                     Charting Scott

Scott’s ascendant is at 29 Aquarius, directly opposite Regulus, where his Jupiter lies.  That seems to be an unfortunate placement — a wildly exuberant Jupiter on the Throne spending lavishly on entertainment, travel and liquor, its almost reminiscent of the Sun King, Louis XVI, though I do not know for sure.

Still, even for a king, this cannot be a good placement, too much frolicky and not enough attention to his duties and lo and behold his T-square gets a point focus not at the midheaven but with erratic Uranus nearby.  Saturn is close, right between individualistic Uranus and his Ascendants Lord, and Mercury, giving him a crisp writing style that almost swings with that Charleston Beat.  Hemingway was right, Scott was indeed a gifted writer, his chart shows a quintile for every septile,  but he had little respect for it except when he was down and needed cash, typically to pay Zelda’s hospital bills.

                                                      What type is that anyhow?

We have not run into this type of chart previously, but Scott was a deviated bowl.  Everything pretty much fits within that Western hemisphere pushing his experience out to the floor for all its worth, but there is a wide gap between Jupiter and Mars — a bit too wide that suggests he was always running from pillar to post and back again.  Thankfully, he has the majority of his planets in fixed houses, so he was adamant about writing, and it seems he kept a detailed journal, but writing fiction takes time, and a lot of it, for long stretches and  Scott with planets in mutable signs did sporadically.

Of course, it is natural, like Hemingway did, to blame Zelda, everyone did and she was a diagnosed schizophrenic, but looking at his chart, one realizes how much like Jimmy Buffet’s theme, Wasted Away Again in Margaritaville, “it was his own damn fault.”

Marc Jones noted his septiles remarking that they show a person’s tendency to get fixed into a pattern of self-compulsion.  In Scott’s chart, we see with Uranus up top, showing how his need for independent self-expression thwarted his life’s purpose. Here, this particular septile led Scott to compromise his artistic value for a paycheck.  He did that with  “This Side of Paradise” and again, most notably in the legendary rewrite of “Gone with the Wind” where the company’s crony got the notice and Scott got a paycheck, not even mentioned in the credits.

Probably his most sustained work, and masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, but the pity is, there could have been so much more.

 

Download F scott fitzgerald’s chart.

 

#101 Dr. Alexis Carrel & the Dakin Solution

Before Dr. Alexander Fleming invented penicillin, Dr. Carrel developed the Dakin Solution, a type of hypochlorite solution made from bleach that is diluted and then treated to decrease skin irritation. Chlorine, the active ingredient in Dakin’s solution, is a potent antiseptic that kills most forms of bacteria and viruses. This simple solution saved many men in World War I and is still used when people are out in the wild, far from critical care centers and hospitals.

nobels.png
The inner chart is Dr. Carrel’s natal.  The outer is the Nobel Committee’s announcement — always December 10.  The ascendant of the announcement is in healthy Virgo opposite his Ascendant in Pisces of Universal concern.  The Nobel Midheaven is then opposite Mars in Sagittarius or the sign of battle. The Nobel Committee made a good pick.

Carrel though had already won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1912 for his experimental, and ultimately successful work, on vascular suturing & the grafting of blood vessels and organs.”  He is considered a forerunner of Dr. Christiaan Bernard’s cardiac transplant surgery because of his Nobel work.    His other honours are Legion d’Honneur, France; Nordhoff-Jung Prize for Cancer Research, 1930; the Newman Foundation Award, Univ. of Illinois, 1937 and the Rotary Club of New York Service Award, 1939 and honorary memberships of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR
 

                      The Fixed Quality

Dr. Carrel, as Marc Jones points out in the Essentials of Astrology, has a preponderance of fixed planets in his charts (Taurus, Leo, Scorpio &Aquarius). This preponderance is not a focal determinator¹,  but a characteristic within the chart that is striking.  It is not an exterior philosophy overlayed like Hellenic Lords.  For Carrel, this Fixed Quality demonstrates work method — careful application and precision – somewhat like an engineer applying himself to a problem ignoring no detail.  The following list  are the seven planets  in fixed signs.

  • 1. Pluto in Taurus
  • 2. Venus in Taurus
  • 3. Uranus in Leo
  • 4. Moon in Leo
  • 5. Jupiter in Leo
  • 6. Mars in Scorpio
  • 7. Saturn in Aquarius

Pluto, not discovered before Carrel’s great invention, but later in 1931, is on the Third House Cusp & suggests that Carrel was very concerned about ravages of War on his Brethren and his  Pisces Ascendant 14.37 in the Twelfth supports that universal attitude.   It also shows his post-Pluto career as a writer, for in 1935 he penned, L’Homme, cet inconnu (Man, The Unknown) that was a best seller despite its rambling manner.  In L’Homme, Carrel claimed that biology was a solution to problems of modern life and society.  French historian, André Pichot² said it was written by a “great humanist,” obviously sensing Carrel’s Splash Temperament type.

 Carrel pioneered in another Taurean field, thoracic surgery, Taurus rules the throat .  His Dragon’s tail is in the ninth house: Carrel died in Paris on November 5, 1944, from a heart attack — Mars in Scorpio trine Sun in Cancer, exalted in its own house and thus making him a bit more than naturally predisposed to that ailment. particularly as Cancer’s ruler, is in the fifth making it that the luminaries switched houses.
The Carrel’s had no children.   His wife, Anne-Marie-Laure Gourley de la Motte de Meyrie, whom he married in 1913, was his only survivor.

dr. alexis carrel.pdf



Footnotes:

  1. Focal Determinator is Marc Jones term for this special interest planet.  It is always of special concern to the native because it is how they manage and cope with stress.
  2. Geroulanos, Stefanos, “An Atheism that is not Humanist Emerges in French Thought,” Stanford, CA, Stanford University Press, c. 2010

Cassini-Hugyens says goodbye to the jewel of the universe, Saturn

7781_Maize_6-16.jpg
Cassini’s path into Saturn’s upper atmosphere

Cassini via JPL sent its last pictures of Saturn onto us this week, and they are real beauties.

Cassini has been in space for two decades, and has allowed us to observe weather and seasonal changes Saturn, now at mission-end and having spent almost every bit of the rocket propellant it carried to get to its target the gaseous Saturn it disintegrates it will not affect Saturn’s moons, but just push further and further into the gas giant.

This means that both Saturn’s rings and moons will remain pristine for future exploration—in particular, the ice-covered ocean-bearing moon Enceladus, and Titan, with its intriguing pre-biotic chemistry will remain undisturbed. Perhaps someday, when the costs are lower, we will explore them further.

The major effect Cassini has had on its viewers is its pioneering firsts. See a list of them here. The Midheaven now in the eleventh at 01 Aquarius is old adobe mission rests in the shelter of the California hills and seems as ancient as the mountains behind it. This is a symbol of man’s his capacity to seem more a part of things than the things themselves. Positively it is a degree of recognition of established values spanning time.

On Sept. 15, 2017, the spacecraft will make its last approach to the giant planet Saturn. and then Cassini will then burn up like a meteor.  Read more at the JPL site. Our chart above is the seventh harmonic based from Houston, because we have no longitude for where Cassini really lies, somewhere out there in Saturn, so it more of what NASA is experiencing and feeling than the little robot.

7768_6_7_17.Goldstone_06.jpg
Where to find Saturn in the Sky During Cassini’s End of Mission

A ball of laughs Jay Thomas

Radio gets results

I knew of Jay from his radio days in NYC I think on WPLJ. He was a popular DJ, very entertaining, lots of jokes and stories and played some good music. Then he disappeared and popped up on Mork and Mindy as Remo DaVinci the co-owner of a deli where Mork (Robin Williams) and Mindy (Pam Dawber) seemed to hang out.

I don’t know how that happened, but with Jupiter in the twelfth sudden and propitious things do happen, and that seemed to be how Jay and I would meet. Out of nowhere, he would pop up tell some stories and disappear only to show up on a totally different venue. He was irrepressible.

He died a week ago at 69 from cancer, his agent, Don Buchwald, said.

TV and then radio, again

His quick tongue also served him well on the talk-show circuit. He was especially ubiquitous on “Late Show With David Letterman,” where he appeared every Christmas season telling about a challenge with Clayton Moore — the Lone Ranger — that involved throwing footballs at a Christmas tree. Here’s one of my favorites with Jay on Letterman about his plastic surgery.

He also pursued a radio career, even as he developed his acting side. Most recently, he had a show on SiriusXM satellite radio. Mr. Thomas found amusement in the way people confused him with his television characters.

“I’m from New Orleans,” he added. “My father was a WASP and my mother was Italian.” Mr. Thomas was born Jon Thomas Terrell in Kermit, Tex., on July 12, 1948, and raised in New Orleans. During college — he attended several universities — he started dabbling in sportscasting and also did stand-up comedy; he eventually found himself on the radio in New York. He later became well known for his work on Power 106 in Los Angeles.

With Jupiter life is always surprising

His wife, Sally Michelson, whom he married in 1987, and their two children, Samuel and Jacob, survive him as does the country singer J. T. Harding, whom he had fathered in his 20s and was given up for adoption. Harding recounted when “I met my biological mother, she told me, ‘Your father is an actor, and he’s on ‘Cheers’, so for about a week I thought Ted Danson was my father.” Jupiter strikes again.

Jay Thomas died on August 24, 2017 in Santa Barbara, CA.

The Jay Map

A natural showman

Jay’s chart setup is a Bundle with a Jupiter handle. The bulk of the planets within the 120 trine of Libra to Gemini with just Jupiter near the ascendant outside lurking in the twelfth house. It is an unusual setup; most handled charts are buckets with the one hemisphere filled, so here with the bundle we see an exuberant personality just bursting forth.

He was naturally a cheerful person, and his infectious spirit was something that brought also him misery (the twelfth house is also the house of self undoing. Luckily, Jupiter also gives a parachute for soft landings.

Jay loved an audience and the sixth house depicts a hard worker who didn’t know the meaning of retirement, hence the radio show on Sirius FM but Jupiter is also square his Mars in the ninth and shows an explosive spirit that could not fathom moderation — he was always “on.” and that could be grueling for those close to him who sometimes want peace and quiet.

His ascendant is 26 Sagittarius 59, gets the symbol of a gypsy coming out of the forest” which Jones writes is about the individual faith in his own potential. Its ruler Jupiter is nearby at 20 Sagittarius 49, “a child and dog with eyeglasses” showing his love of life and skill at bridging the dimensions of life.

His midheaven is 14 Libra 01,”circular paths” shown in his career as he started and ended in radio while his part of fortune 21 Pisces 50 or the “man bringing down the law” highlighting his spiritual beliefs shown with his embrace of his estranged adult son.

jay lines
jay lines

Jay Lines

His Line of Vitality is squared (Moon to Sun ) suggesting that he just ate up the variety of life and truly enjoyed changing roles, homes and experiences. This fed into his hard working ethic, having to adapt to his surroundings. See the BLACK LINES.

His Life of Motivation, the GOLD LINES, from Saturn to Jupiter in the Twelfth, is Trine giving him an easy manner that made people naturally like him.

His Line of Efficiency, the TURQUOISE LINES, from Venus in the Sixth House to Mars, in the Ninth is squared.  This Line suggests that his personable manner made it easier than for most, travelling from set to set, from company to company and place to place for his career. While some would have found this an onerous burden, Mr. Thomas felt it was another tool that he could add to his box of acting.

Finally his fourth set, the Line of Significance, the RED LINES, from Uranus to Neptune in the Ninth this time, encourage that Mars for personal significance and acclaim amongst his peers. He has nothing in his Eleventh House, so Mr. Thomas did not work for his fans, but for his genuine love of his work and that fed his appetite.

With Jupiter as Lord of his chart, he must have been a tireless worker and a non-stop talker. Requiescat in pacem.

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